To [read] aloud is very brave – (138)

During the past six months, I have been told that I read poorly aloud by multiple people. Never in my life has anyone said this to me so frequently.

When I was twelve years old, I started becoming interested in public speaking. (I say my interest starts at twelve, because I remember going to nationals for the science fair that year. I was more con artist than scientist affectionately.) I began participating in debate groups, dabbled in stand-up comedy for awhile, and even started recording myself just talking about things to see how it sounded. It’s something I still do. I loved standing in front of a crowd, but now I wonder if that love is leaving me.

I have been feeling down lately about it all. Even if my writing isn’t that great, I hope to at least read a piece well before an audience and connect with someone. In the last six months, I keep hearing things like:

“I can’t pay attention, because I get lost in your voice.”

“You sound robotic.”

“Stop reading that way. Just let me read it to myself.”

These words rebound in my thoughts too often. Just this past week, I was going to read a few paragraphs from Chris Offutt’s “My Dad, the Pornographer” to my student organization, a group that I am considerably comfortable with, and I hesitated before reading and became apathetic to a degree. I thought for a moment that I should have asked for someone else to read and spared them all the sound of my voice.

I like to think back to a moment in my Keats class last spring when a student said to me during discussion: “Sarah Key, I love it when you read aloud. It just makes things click.” I think back to my best friend and how she was the first person to ever tell me that she liked my voice. I think back to last summer when one of my students raucously shouted, “I love your voice!” over the drum of other oddities being yelled my way, and that stands out to me more than anything.

Lately, I hear the words robotic and stop when I begin to read aloud. I wonder if I am dragging my feet to submit an abstract to this forum or neglecting setting up certain local lit events, because I don’t want to hear my own voice at them. I wonder if I have stopped reading to myself in the mornings when I am alone for the same reason.

4 comments

  1. Corvin · February 15, 2015

    You have a lovely voice in conversation. If you can turn your reading aloud into conversation it will be exemplary, to compliment your excellent writing.

  2. D. Eaton · February 15, 2015

    I have never thought of you as a poor reader or speaker. It’s probably a matter of personal taste in your audiences.

  3. starmanjones · February 15, 2015

    Perhaps I’m the opposite. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve caused many a nap, yet I can also convey to do it anyway attitude. most of my reading situations are in such poor lighting I cant see to read with my glasses…remember I’m already legally blinds so ;) this leads to slanting the page for projection. do i read badly though? I didn’t ask you if I wrote well ;)

  4. jr cline · February 16, 2015

    Don’t listen to this critics. I’m sure it’s there problem, not something about you. Read aloud!!!!!

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